The Nave

The Nave

You will enter the church by the North door. The most striking feature you will notice, as you look to your left, is the view up the nave to the chancel and the sanctuary. Let you eyes follow the length of the chancel aisle, rising ever higher to the cross on the altar. The perspective of height and distance is due to the successive levels of steps: two from the nave to the chancel, two more half-way to the sanctuary and three more to the alter rails. This is said to be due to the slope of the ground. You may prefer to believe that it intentionally draws your eyes upward and into the distance.

Look behind you at the board and iron-studded door, with, its ‘bullet’ holes aprocriphally left by Cromwellian soldier. Above the door is a very interesting window, which is visible only from the interior of the church. The window is the original double-splayed Saxon one. Traces of a second window can be seen in the north wall about 16’ east. Also in the north wall are two conspicuous features: the arch of the door-way blocked-up in the 12th. Century and a consecration cross probably dating from the same time.

Note also the corbels on the tops of the pillars forming the nave arcade; one portraying the chubby face of a man; the other a man with a curious beard, holding his hands to his ears. Both are early workmanship and notable for their primitive vigour.