12th and 13th Centuries

12th and 13th Centuries

In 1195 the Archbishop of Canterbury Hubert Walter who was Justiciar to Richard I, laid covetous eyes on the manor of Lambeth, as it would give him a base in London. A deal was therefore arranged with the Bishop of Rochester who owned Lambeth, whereby Lambeth was exchanged for Darenth. Darenth thus became the property of Rochester.

A notable feature of this particular age in England was the deep religious feeling which directed the daily lives of the populace. This found expression in the fervour which inspired the Crusades and the many extensions to churches. During this time the nave was extended to the south with a squint provided to give a view of the altar. A side chapel was in a bad state of repair and, as there were no funds for the work, it was demolished and the arches adjoining the chancel blocked up. The latter can still be seen on the south side of the chancel. However there is one part of the church built during this period which still exists, namely the tower of the south-west corner, which was very strongly built of flints, with walls 4ft. thick. The tower is crowned with a plain shingled broach spire of the usual Kent type.

 
 
The squint with view of Altar
 
The Squint with view of Altar